Thursday, 8 February 2018

HEGARTY ON CREATIVITY

 



[ PHOTOGRAPHY: Myself ]


Besides my love for the aesthetic, the doodles and the humour, this little book has taught me a lot about creativity. It has opened my eyes to looking at creativity from a different perspective and has taught me how to rip apart my thoughts and glue them back together in a way that utilises my creative talent as a storyteller. Below are some segments from the book and the observations I made from them, but you HAVE to read the book yourself, it's eye opening.

ORIGINALITY IS DEPENDENT UPON THE OBSCURITY OF YOUR SOURCES

There is no such thing as originality. Your idea only exists in relation to other ideas. However, if you explore an array of sources for inspiration, then your idea can be fresher than others. This makes for a good one.

WORDS ARE A BARRIER TO COMMUNICATION

We are living in an ever-increasing visual society with so much information thrown at us. It is easier for us to absorb all this visually and so as storytellers we must utilise this. Furthermore, the words we do use must communicate effectively with fewer of them.

WHEN THE WORLD ZIGS, ZAG

Always look in the opposite direction to find a more innovative idea, never go with the most obvious option. Sometimes looking for something that might not link to your original idea can lead to new concepts and an innovative outcome.

SWAP SEATS

If we go about our lives in the same daily routine then we will look at everything in the same way, from the same angle. We need to have regular change to stimulate new ideas and therefore should keep changing from our routines, whether that be changing your workplace or moving cities.

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Emily
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Wednesday, 7 February 2018

THE YEAR IN FASHION: 1998




As I was searching through fashion documentaries to watch I found this rather dated American one on the year 1998. This just so happens to be the year I was born and it was monumental in the fashion industry. From Donatella's debut after tributes had been paid to Gianni Versace at the Met Gala to the rise of young American designers taking on Parisian houses, a lot was happening. Below are some observations I had:

TOM FORD AT GUCCI


Far from the Gucci we adore today, Tom Ford's time at the brand in the 90's achieved well executed minimalism. He focused on small details of the garments like a tiny logo which he said let people know it was Gucci. I loved his use of underwear combined with outerwear garments as it felt much more innovative than what other designers were achieving with the minimalist macro trend at the time.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN


In a time of minimalism, McQueen, nine shows into his career, was pushing boundaries and creating innovative garments and shows. His Spring 1998 show saw rain fall onto the catwalk, drenching models with choppy haircuts in provocative designs. At the time this was so exciting and innovative, yet as designers now try to achieve controversy, it leaves me questioning what is actually controversial and what is now socially normal. 

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Emily
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Monday, 5 February 2018

BBC 4 Perfume Documentary



[ PHOTOGRAPHY: Google ]

I was able to gain a lot of insight into the perfume industry through the BBC 4 series. From exploring the traditional Guerlain laboratories and luxurious shopping experience of the high end market to high street perfumes and niche curations, I learnt a lot that I can take with me through to my own project. 

I feel like the documentary enlightened me to how perfume can deliver stories to consumers so easily and how easy it is to sell a story when the physical product is simply fragranced liquid. I also hadn't realised quite to what extent the stories being told now are predictable. There are very few brands in the segment producing really innovative concepts and this gives me an exciting opportunity when it comes to curating my own.

I found the episode on "noses" inspiring. They take scent inspiration from all of their surroundings. For example when the founder of the CB I Hate Perfume Gallery in Brooklyn came to London and was aiming to create a perfume that smelt utterly British for a client, he smelt everything from bus seats to the ales in a pub. Even though I will be focusing on telling a story rather than creating the exact scent, I can take inspiration from this approach by allowing myself to be inspired by appropriate surroundings relating to the story I come to tell. 

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Emily
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Thursday, 1 February 2018

House of Z: A Documentary on Zac Posen





[ PHOTOGRAPHY: Images sourced from Google ]

House of Z was a very moving documentary. I wasn't aware of how Zac Posen became to be a brand and seeing how it grew with the help of Posen's family was very heart warming. It was also intriguing to see how easily it is to be criticised within the fashion industry as a brand or influencer after one small event and how it is hard to leave it in the past.

Being let into Posen's world felt very personal. I loved delving into his college years and seeing all the people he was brought up with and how he was surrounded by the upmost creative talent. You could really see his drapery talent at work in his studio. I loved watching that technique of designing garments as he could create dresses that wouldn't have been envisioned if the idea had gone straight from paper to toile.

Overall, I found his passion for what he does as well as the drive and risk everyone around him took to make the brand a success, very inspiring.

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Emily
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© Emily Rhodes

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